Toyota news – electric and fuel cell cars

Toyota Fuel Cell Cars

In 2002, Toyota introduced the first fuel cell car at the University of California Davis Institute of Transportation Studies. The Toyota Highlander operates by using a direct electrical current. Simply put, this vehicle can drive 347 miles on one tank of water and a battery. According to Toyota, Americans have saved $2.19 billion dollars in fuel costs by driving Toyota energy efficient vehicles.
Electric and Fuel Cell Cars

Car buyers should keep in mind that there is a difference between electric cars and fuel cell cars. Electric cars are battery powered and fuel cell cars are powered by water. In 2015, Toyota will introduce a hydrogen fuel cell car. The Toyota official website does not say exactly what type of fuel cell car will be introduced. There are very few details about this new vehicle. It will have zero gas emissions and zero water emissions from the exhaust system.

Toyota Hydrogen Fuel Cars

A USA Today report states that “Toyota is currently testing 100 hydrogen fuel cell cars.” The cars platforms are based on the Toyota Highlander crossover. On November 30, 2011, journalists got a chance to preview the Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV-R) at the Tokyo Motor Show. The FCV-R will have a price range between $50,000 and $100,000 when it makes its debut in 2015. It will seat four passengers. The FCV-R is 189.8 inches long and 71.6 inches wide. This car is also 60.4 inches tall and it carries two hydrogen tanks underneath the floor of the vehicle.

Mass Production

In the future, Toyota will be mass producing fuel cell cars. Toyota is trying to find new fuel alternatives. Today, consumers can buy a hybrid, a plug-in hybrid, or an electric Toyota car. In about two years, consumers will have another option. That option will be hydrogen fuel cell cars at local Toyota dealerships. However, there are a few challenges that Toyota and consumers will have to face.

Finally, consumers will need to be educated on how to properly maintain and care for Toyota hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. Also, the company reduced the number of possible hydrogen stations from 60 to 30. Customers need to know where the hydrogen stations will be located. There is still a lot of work to be done before consumers can start driving Toyota’s “green cars.”

References:

Toyota Delivers First Fuel Cell Car to UC Davis

Toyota Highlander Fuel Cell Runs 2300 Miles

United States Department of Energy:Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

Toyota:Fuel Cell Technology